Roast Loin of Pork with Mustard Crust Brings out “Wows” at The Table

 

If you are tired of making the same holiday ham  I hope you’ll try this delectable recipe. When I developed this idea I thought about how good a mustard crust would be on a loin of pork. I was happily surprised at the resounding “wows” I received from the lucky tasters at my table.

Sounds complicated? In fact this recipe is so easy to make it might become a standard at your table during any of your holidays. The cognac sauce adds welcome flavor to the meat and the mustard applesauce is reminiscent of the classic pork chops and applesauce.

Remember that pork is 30% leaner than it was just a few decades ago so it will dry out if overcooked. In the past it was thought that pork had to be cooked until well done to avoid the risk of trichinosis. Make sure you cook the pork 5 to 10 degrees lower than you want it to be because it continues to cook as it rests. It’s okay if it is slightly pink inside.

Perfect for a dinner party, this moist pork roast is complemented by a savory Cognac and mustard sauce. Try serving this with braised spinach and rice pilaf. Or consider serving this with roasted Potatoes and Green Beans. For dessert, how about a chocolate pie?

To Drink? The two sauces are the keys here, so match the dish’s sweet and spice elements with a wine that delivers both. If white is your preference, select an off-dry Riesling from New York, Washington or Germany. For a red, a supple yet spicy flavored Australian Shiraz or Californian Zinfandel will be sublime.

 

Roast Loin of Pork with Mustard Crust

 

Serves 6 to 8

 

Mustard Apple Sauce

2 cups favorite apple sauce (Trader Joe’s Chunky-style is good)

2 teaspoons Dijon style mustard

 

Mustard Coating

1/2 cup Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons mustard seeds

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon favorite seasoning salt

Freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons olive oil

 

1 (3 1/2 pound) pork loin roast, tied

 

Cognac Sauce

1/2 cup cognac

1 cup chicken stock

3 tablespoons crème fraiche or heavy whipping cream

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

Pinch coarsely ground white pepper

 

  1. To make the applesauce: combine the applesauce with the mustard in a small serving bowl and mix to combine. Cover and refrigerate until serving.

 

  1. Combine all of the mustard coating ingredients in a small bowl and mix to combine. Preheat the oven to 375F. Place the roast on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Using plastic disposable gloves spread mustard coating evenly all over the roast.

 

  1. Roast the pork for about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours or until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the roast registers 140F. Remove from the oven and transfer the roast to a carving board. Cover with aluminum foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Place the roasting pan on the top of the stove.

 

  1. To make the Cognac sauce: Add the cognac and stock to the roasting pan, and increase the heat to high. Bring to boil, scraping up the brown bits. Boil until the alcohol has burned off and the liquid is slightly reduced, about 3 minutes. Whisk in cream and mustard and bring to boil. Cook until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add pepper and whisk well. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Strain the sauce into a gravy boat of bowl.

 

  1. Remove the string from the pork and slice the pork. Arrange the slices on a platter and spoon over some of the Cognac sauce. Garnish with parsley. Serve with the remaining cognac sauce and the applesauce on the side.

 

Advance Preparation: The applesauce mixture and mustard paste may be prepared 1 day ahead, covered and refrigerated.

 

The Clever Cook Could:

 

  • Make this dish using pork tenderloins; figure 3 (1 1/4 pound) tenderloins and make sure not to let them touch when baking. Bake for about 25 to 35 minutes or until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the roast registers 140F. Pork tenderloin is very tender and the sliced pieces will be smaller than the loin

 

  • Try the mustard crust on leg of lamb

 

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